A funny thing happened on the way to the Jedi library…

Last week, I awoke on Thursday, May 4th, to a series of pingbacks and increased traffic to my Reel Librarians blog post about the Jedi librarian, Jocasta Nu, and her epic fail of a reference interview in Star Wars, Episode II:  Attack of the Clones (2002).

Reel Librarians: Star Wars Library Scene

Jocasta Nu, the Jedi librarian, from Star Wars, Episode II: Attack of the Clones (2002)

“It’s May the Fourth,” I thought.”OF COURSE I’m getting traffic to my Jedi librarian post!” But then I realized that the pingbacks were all pointing toward ONE specific article, namely Ben Guarino’s piece entitled “Unchecked fake news gave rise to an evil empire in Star Wars,” published in The Washington Post on May 4, 2017. The pingbacks started at 3:19 a.m. PST, as you can see in the screenshot below.

Reel Librarians | Pingbacks on my Jedi librarian post

Pingbacks on my Jedi librarian post

The “Unchecked fake news gave rise to an evil empire in Star Wars” piece is quite long, starting out with a dig at the professions in the Star Wars universe, including no journalists and a sole librarian:

Reel Librarians | Screenshot of Washington Post article

Intro paragraph to Washington Post article

And this paragraph about in the middle of the Guarino’s piece is the one that includes a link to my Jedi librarian post:

Reel Librarians | Screenshot of Washington Post article

Screenshot of Washington Post article, with link to Jedi librarian post

When I told my husband — a lifelong Star Wars fan — the news, his face lit up. This is how he reacted on Facebook:

Reel Librarians | My husband's reaction on Facebook to the Washington Post article link

My husband’s reaction on Facebook to the Washington Post article link

Although I originally wrote the “Jedi librarian” post in spring of 2013, it continues to be a fan favorite, earning a spot in the list of most popular posts in both 2015 and 2016. I think with the help of The Washington Post, the “Jedi librarian” post is headed toward making the list again in 2017… 😀

 

The Quotable Librarian | Inspirational quotes from famous librarians

I don’t know about y’all, but I feel like I need some inspiration around here. I haven’t done a “Quotable Librarian” post in quite awhile — the last one was over two years ago, in February 2015! — so I thought it high time for another post in the series.

I thought about what kind of theme would be appropriate, and inspirational, this time around. And that’s when I came to seeking out inspirational quotes about libraries and librarians from real-life librarians themselves, including writers who were librarians.

Let the inspiration commence!


Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986)


“I have always imagined Paradise as a kind of library.”

~ “Poem of the Gifts” [“Poema de los Dones”], Dreamtigers, 1960

"Jorge Luís Borges 1951" by Grete Stern (1904-1999) is in the Public Domain

“Jorge Luís Borges 1951” by Grete Stern (1904-1999) is in the Public Domain

This is arguably the most famous of all library-related quotes, from the writer and librarian Jorge Luis Borges. He rose to be the Director of the National Library of Argentina in 1955, but was forced to resign (twice, in 1946 and in 1973) due to political clashes with Juan Perón. But all the while, he was writing.

“I cannot think it unlikely that there is such a total book on some shelf in the universe. I pray to the unknown gods that some man — even a single man, tens of centuries ago — has perused and read this book. If the honor and wisdom and joy of such a reading are not to be my own, then let them be for others. Let heaven exist, though my own place may be in hell. Let me be tortured and battered and annihilated, but let there be one instant, one creature, wherein thy enormous Library may find its justification.”

“Deutsches Requiem,” Emece edition, 1974


Carla Hayden (1952- )


“Librarians were called during that time [during the Patriot Act] feisty fighters for freedom, and we were very proud of that label.”

~ interview with Jeffrey Brown, PBS, 2016

Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress (2016- )

Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress (2016- )

Carla Hayden is our current and 14th Librarian of Congress, becoming the first woman and the first African American to lead our national library. She received her master’s and doctorate degrees in Library Science from the University of Chicago Graduate Library School, and she worked as a children’s and public librarian.


Madeleine L’Engle (1918-2007)


“To be a librarian, particularly a librarian for young adults, is to be a nourisher, to share stories, offer books full of new ideas. We live in a world which has changed radically in the last half century, and story helps us to understand and live creatively with change.”

~ Acceptance Speech for the Margaret Edwards Award, 1998

Madeleine L’Engle was a longtime librarian and writer-in-residence at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York. She won the Newbery Award in 1963 for the young adult classic novel, A Wrinkle in Time.

“”A Wrinkle in Time” writer Madeleine L’Engle shows off her writing spot” uploaded by gconversations, Standard YouTube License.


Beverly Cleary


“I haven’t been very enthusiastic about the commercialization of children’s literature. Kids should borrow books from the library and not necessarily be buying them.”

~2006 interview

“My mother always kept library books in the house, and one rainy Sunday afternoon — this was before television, and we didn’t even have a radio — I picked up a book to look at the pictures and discovered I was reading and enjoying what I read.”

~2011 interview

Beverly Cleary was raised in Oregon and became a librarian, first working as a children’s librarian and then at a medical hospital library during World War II. She won the 1981 National Book Award for Ramona and Her Mother and the 1984 Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw. Cleary has also written two entertaining autobiographies, A Girl from Yamhill (1988) and My Own Two Feet (1995).

"Beverly Cleary in 1971" via State Library Photograph Collection, 1851-1990, Washington State Archives, Digital Archives is in the Public Domain

“Beverly Cleary in 1971” via State Library Photograph Collection, 1851-1990, Washington State Archives, Digital Archives is in the Public Domain


Avi (1937- )


“For some 25 years, I worked as a librarian… My life has always been with, around, and for books.”

~ Scholastic.com article

Avi (pen name of Edward Irving Wortis) is a writer of children’s and YA books, winning the Newbery Award in 2003 for Crispin. He was one of my favorite authors when I was growing up, and I loved his two Newbery Honor books, The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle (1991) and Nothing But the Truth (1992). He was a librarian at the New York Public Library and at Trenton State College.

“Meet the Author: Avi” by adlit, Standard YouTube License.


Laura Bush (1946- )


“I have found the most valuable thing in my wallet is my library card.”

“Every child in American should have access to a well-stocked school library. … An investment in libraries is an investment in our children’s future.”

~ As quoted in Biography Today : Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers, 2003

Laura Bush was the First Lady of the United States from 2001-2009, and she worked as a school librarian in Texas. As First Lady, she helped establish the semi-annual National Book Festival.

"Norbert Claussen and Laura Bush," 2007, by Shealah Craighead, White House photographer, is in the Public Domain

“Norbert Claussen and Laura Bush,” 2007, by Shealah Craighead, White House photographer, is in the Public Domain


Nancy Pearl (1945- )


“The role of a librarian is to make sense of the world of information. If that’s not a qualification for superhero-dom, what is?”

~ as quoted in Seattle Times, 10 July 2003

Nancy Pearl is one of the most famous librarians of the modern age, well-known for her Book Lust series and philosophy that it’s okay to not finish reading a book if you don’t like it after 50 pages. She also was the model for the “shushing librarian” action figure doll!

“Librarian Action Figure from Archie McPhee” by Archie McPhee, Standard YouTube License.


Any favorite quotes of yours here? Or would you like to add a quote to the list? Please leave a comment and share!

And if you’re interested in reading more about famous real-life librarians, then check out:

 

Tweets about Reel Librarians

After a couple of intense and in-depth film analyses these last few weeks, I thought it might be nice to try something a little lighter.

I admit that I’m not personally on Twitter — and I don’t have a Twitter account for my site Reel Librarians, either — but every so often, it’s fun to explore on Twitter if anyone’s tweeted about Reel Librarians. And lo and behold, they have! 😀

Here are some of the tweet themes I’ve noticed over the years, as well as some (not all) of my favorite tweets about the Reel Librarians site in general or about specific posts:


Such a site exists!


Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot


Real librarians love watching reel librarians


Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot

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Twitter snapshot

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Twitter snapshot


Loving research


Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot


Loving librarians in horror films


Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot

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Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot


Loving The Librarians TV show


Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot


Loving librarian style


Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot


VIP reader and tweeter


Emily, a librarian and bee keeper, is a longtime reader of Reel Librarians, and comments frequently on posts. I love that she has also tweeted often about the site — thanks so much, Emily! 😀 😀 😀

Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot

Twitter snapshot


#HarryPotterFanGirl

And last but not least, what might just be my personal favorite tweet about Reel Librarians, directly from actress Sally Mortemore, who played librarian Madam Pince in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002). She personally responded to the post I wrote about Madame Pince, comparing the librarian character in the books with her onscreen portrayal.

Twitter snapshot


Hope you enjoyed the Reel Librarian-themed tweets! I’ll be back next week with more reel librarian fun 😀

Reader poll write-up: Teenage Mother

Teenage Mother (1967) won the recent reader poll, squeaking past at the last minute due to my husband’s shameless promotion. He gets the credit blame for this post, as he wanted to watch ME watching this film, just for my reactions. I had some. 😉

My DVD copy of this film is from Something Weird Video in Seattle, with a “special edition” DVD. Something Weird promotes itself as “the very best in exploitation cinema,” and that rings true for Teenage Mother. The back of the DVD case has Handsome Harry Archer’s complete review of Teenage Mother, which opens with stating it as a “textbook example of classic old-school exploitation.” The film was directed by Jerry Gross, who would later direct the cult classic I Spit on Your Grave.

*SPOILERS AHEAD*

Reel Librarians | DVD case for 'Teenage Mother' (1967)

DVD case for ‘Teenage Mother’ (1967)

The basics

Here’s the basic plot, such as it is:  A new health teacher is hired to teach sex education in a high school and gets blamed when a student turns up pregnant. Except the student isn’t actually pregnant. She just told her boyfriend that so that he wouldn’t leave her and go off to medical school. Winners, all. And there’s footage of a live birth at the end. And an extended musical interlude in the middle. Cue the sweet anticipation!

As my husband said:

When you have a 70-minute film and only 40 minutes worth of plot, you HAVE to fill it with musical interludes and a live birth at the end!

To be clear, this movie is NOT good. It is bad. I knew it would be bad. But the question in my mind was this:  Was it SO bad that it would turn out to be awesomely bad? Unfortunately, NO. But as my husband quipped:

It’s the kind of bad that almost feels like a cultural moment.

The film starts off with footage of a stock-car race. Because WHY NOT.

Reel Librarians | Title screen from 'Teenage Mother' (1967)

Title screen from ‘Teenage Mother’ (1967)

Introducing the books and the school librarian

Fifteen minutes into the film, the coach gets to introduce the new health teacher, Miss Erika Petersen (Julie Ange), who dives straight into the required and supplemental texts for the new “anatomical biology” course.

Fun fact:  This film was the film debut of Fred Willard, who plays the coach!

Reel Librarians | Miss Petersen introduces the two textbooks for the new sex education class, in 'Teenage Mother' (1967)

Miss Petersen introduces the two textbooks for the new sex education class, in ‘Teenage Mother’ (1967)

Miss Petersen:  Two texts are required reading for this course. The first, Moreline’s (?) Basics in Human Anatomy is the best for our line of work. In fact, most colleges use it today. This will be supplemented by Caracola’s (?) Adult Sexual Behavior. Both of these books have been ordered, and we should have them for you early next week.

Miss Petersen:  If any of you would like to do additional reading on this subject, I strongly recommend Saucer’s (?) Male and Female. I’m sure your school library has a copy available.

Tony [a student]:  I’ve already checked the library, and Miss Fowler, the librarian, told me it wasn’t available.

Miss Petersen:  That’s very interesting, Tony. I didn’t know you knew of this book.

Tony:  Well, I’d like to become a doctor. In fact, our family physician Dr. Wilson told me to read this book last year.

Miss Petersen:  And Miss Fowler didn’t know of the book? Well, it’s fairly recent. Perhaps she didn’t notice it in the book publisher’s catalog.

Tony:  She knew of it. She said it was indecent for our library.

[classroom erupts in laughter]

Miss Petersen:  Nonsense. At least 90% of all colleges and universities have this book in their libraries, and as many as 50% of all high schools. I’ll discuss this matter personally with Miss Fowler.

The bell rings, ending this scene after a couple of minutes.

Editor’s note: There were no captions available, and the actress’s “European” accent (dubbed?) makes it hard to understand the authors’ names she was saying, which explains why I put in question marks beside names in the quotations above. I couldn’t find any record of the first two books she mentions in this scene. Also, in the scene above and in the later scene with the school librarian, Miss Petersen clearly states the supplementary book, Male and Female, is by an author whose last name sounds like “Saucer” and that it has been newly published. I searched WorldCat — ’cause y’all know I would, right?! — but could not find any book published by that title in the late ’60s by an author with a similar last name. There was, however, a well-known text in this field, Male and Female: A Study of the Sexes in a Changing World, written and published in 1949 by Margaret Mead. And interestingly, there was another edition of this book published by Penguin in 1967, the same year of this film. So why use the same title but change the author? Just another question among many when it comes to this movie!

School library scene

At almost half an hour into the film, we get the library scene. It’s a very short scene, lasting a minute or less. But it is memorable. I have also nicknamed the school librarian “Fowler the Scowler,” as you shall soon see why.

Reel Librarians | School library and librarian in 'Teenage Mother' (1967)

School library and librarian in ‘Teenage Mother’ (1967)

The scene begins with a wide shot of the school library — the film was filmed at East Rockaway High School in Long Island, so I assume this was also their school library — and the school librarian (an uncredited role) is checking in or filing cards in card catalog drawers. The school library is (surprisingly?) filled with lots of students and lots of books.

Miss Petersen walks in, and they make nice for about 5 seconds.

Reel Librarians | The school librarian and the new health teacher meet in 'Teenage Mother' (1967)

The school librarian and the new health teacher meet in ‘Teenage Mother’ (1967)

Miss Petersen:  Good morning, Miss Fowler.

Miss Fowler:  Good morning, Miss Petersen. Can I be of some assistance?

Miss Petersen:  Yes, one of my students, maybe you know him, Tony Michaels. He told me he was unable to find Saucer’s Male and Female on file here. You do have the book, don’t you?

Miss Fowler:  Most certainly not.

Miss Petersen:  Why not, Miss Fowler? It’s one of the most standard texts on anatomical hygiene.

Miss Fowler:  It’s a filthy book.

This outburst and Miss Fowler’s high-pitched exclamation catch the attention of nearby students! Miss Fowler clears her throat.

Reel Librarians | A startled student in the school library in 'Teenage Mother' (1967)

A startled student in the school library in ‘Teenage Mother’ (1967)

Miss Petersen:  Filthy?

Miss Fowler [in a lower voice]:  Yes, filthy! I wouldn’t allow one of our students to even leaf through it. The illustrations are positively vulgar.

Miss Petersen:  They only show the beauty of the human body.

Miss Fowler:  Teenage children are not meant to see such things.

Miss Petersen:  That’s just the point. These youngsters are not children any longer. Their bodies are the bodies of young adults, with all the needs and desires of young adults.

Miss Fowler:  I wouldn’t know about that. [turns her head and looks down, rapidly blinking her eyelids]

Reel Librarians | Librarian closeup from 'Teenage Mother' (1967)

Miss Petersen:  Apparently not. These young people have the right to know about the facts of life. which you say they cannot read. This is a free country, Miss Fowler.

Miss Fowler:  That book has never appeared in this library and never will, as long as I’m here.

Miss Petersen:  Let’s hope that’s not too long.

“Fowler the Scowler” then adjusts her glasses and goes back to filing her cards, an even more pinched look on her face. She ends as she begins the scene, as an uptight, sexually repressed librarian whose mind is closed to new ideas. An uplifting cinematic message for all librarians. 😦

Reel Librarians | The school librarian goes back to filing cards in 'Teenage Mother' (1967)

The school librarian goes back to filing cards in ‘Teenage Mother’ (1967)

I put together a collage of facial expressions to illustrate the reason for my “Fowler the Scowler” nickname of this school librarian:

Reel Librarians | Collage of 'Fowler the Scowler' from 'Teenage Mother' (1967)

Collage of ‘Fowler the Scowler’ from ‘Teenage Mother’ (1967)

Town meeting and attempted censorship

The rest of the film delves into the Tony’s relationship with his girlfriend, Arlene Taylor (played by a real-life Arlene, Arlene Farber), the one who lies about being pregnant in order to trap her boyfriend. She attempts to run away, and her friend confesses the (fake) secret pregnancy to Arlene’s dad, who somehow has the clout to call an immediate “town meeting” at the high school in order to get Miss Petersen fired.

Here’s one memorable line from the town meeting scene, in which the principal defends his decision to hire Miss Petersen:

If your daughter became pregnant, it wasn’t because of anything she read in a book.

Oddly, “Fowler the Scowler” is NOT at that meeting, which I found disappointing. A missed opportunity! In my head, it would have been an awesome ending to have Miss Fowler also join the attempt to get Miss Petersen fired — and then the reverse happens! It would close the loop on Miss Petersen’s final words in the library scene, that she hopes it’s “not too long” before Miss Fowler is gone.

And that’s what this film does:  It makes a real-life librarian root AGAINST a reel librarian. 

In the excellent and thorough reference book on reel librarians, The Image of Librarians in Cinema, 1917-1999, which I reviewed here in this post, the Tevises sum up the censorship message of the film and the ultimate contrast and conflicting messages of the school principal and the school librarian:

Teenage Mother is one of the few films that confronts the topic of sex education materials in secondary schools. Although the principal of the school is progressive, the librarian scorns the value of sex education. Without the support of the librarian, whose responsibility includes obtaining the appropriate learning materials to support instruction and student research, the program’s success is problematical. The film depicts the librarian as the high school’s moral watchdog who uses her power to censor library materials. (p. 122)

Spinster Librarian role

So what role does Miss Fowler play in this film? I would say most definitely the Spinster Librarian character type, with her uptight manner and closed-minded outlook on collection development. The midpoint of her conversation with Miss Petersen — the self-confession of “I wouldn’t know about that” in response to the health teacher’s remark about the body’s “needs and desires” — clinches the deal.

Also, all of the stereotypical physical traits are there:  an older white woman, hair pulled back in a bun, glasses on a lanyard, high-necked blouse, etc. Even though her time onscreen is short, “Fowler the Scowler” is memorable, landing her librarian role and film in the Class III category.

The 30 seconds of “Fowler the Scowler” in Teenage Mother almost rival the 30 seconds of Spinster Librarian infamy in the 1946 classic It’s a Wonderful Life.

Final review and trailer

Here’s an excerpt from Ian Jane’s DVD Talk review of the film:

Preaching to its audience from a fairly lofty perch, the picture purports to deliver a social message about why kids should abstain or at the very least play it safe, but it’s been made so cheaply and marketed with such a sleazy, hyper-sexualized marketing campaign (be sure to watch the trailer which completely misrepresents the film in every way possible) that all of that gets thrown aside. Why? Because it’s obvious that all of this build up and moralizing was simply an excuse to bust out some really graphic footage of a baby popping its way out of some gooey female genitalia.

And finally, I’ve linked to that spectacularly misleading trailer below. I usually like to begin a film analysis post with a trailer, but this trailer needs to come AFTER the film, not before. Also, this trailer IS graphic — as it warns, it includes footage of the live-birth scene from the end of Teenage Mother.

Teenage Mother (1967) Trailer,” uploaded on April 18, 2016, by Vulture Graffix, is licensed under a CC BY license.

Reader poll winner, Spring 2017

The votes for the most recent reader poll are in… and y’all ultimately chose Teenage Mother! This was a tight race, which actually surprised me. At one point, there were three films tied at the top (Teenage Mother, Margie, and The Gun in Betty Lou’s Handbag).

Reel Librarians |  Reader poll winner, Spring 2017

I think my husband’s shameless (shameless!) plug for Teenage Mother on his Facebook page helped boost the film to the top spot. 😉

Reel Librarians | Facebook plug for reader poll

So I will be watching Teenage Mother for the first time this weekend. Next week I will be back with a film analysis post — stay tuned!