Second impressions? Season 2 premiere of ‘The Librarians’

Y’all knew where I was this past Sunday night, right? Watching the Season 2 premiere of “The Librarians” OF COURSE. The premiere kicked off, like last year, with two back-to-back episodes:

  • Episode 1: “And the Drowned Book”
  • Episode 2:  “And the Broken Staff”

*POSSIBLE SPOILERS*

The first episode starts off with the news that the librarians-in-training have all been working on their own for the past few months, so they have to learn to work together again in this episode. The library is back, but Jenkins discovers that items are going missing and that the library is rearranging itself. Something rotten in the state of Denmark?

Reel Librarians | Screenshot from Season 2 premiere of 'The Librarians'

Screenshot from Season 2 premiere of ‘The Librarians’

There are new villains for Season 2, fictional villains from great works of literature — referred to as “Fictionals” — including Prospero from Shakespeare’s The Tempest and Moriarty from the Sherlock Holmes stories. As some of my favorite episodes from Season 1 focused on inventive twists on fairy tales and legends, I am looking forward to the librarians taking on the “Fictionals” throughout Season 2.

My husband, a college English instructor, personally liked how literary Season 2 is already. And I already have more appreciation for the Season 2 tagline, “This season they’ll need every trick in the book.” 😀

Reel Librarians | Screenshot from Season 2 premiere of 'The Librarians'

The gang is back together! Librarians unite! Screenshot from Season 2 premiere of ‘The Librarians’

My favorite bits from Episode 1, “And the Drowned Book”:

  • 8 minutes in, Flynn and Eve are going to a museum exhibit on a new mission:
    • Flynn:  A new exhibit brings in the fundraisers and gives the big-wigs a chance to rub elbows with the rock star archivists and librarians.
    • Eve:  Every girl’s dream.
  • 30 minutes in, Flynn’s fan-boy glee when he thinks he’s met Sherlock Holmes:  I love you! I mean, I love your adventures… A team-up with Sherlock Holmes!
  • 45 minutes in, Prospero casts Shakespeare as the villain:  Shakespeare broke my staff; he drowned my book. Who is more real? Authors or their creations? Again, I appreciate how inventive the writing is.
  • Almost 50 minutes in, the librarians are trying to figure out how to stop the storm system of hurricanes Prospero has unleashed upon New York. Problem-solving at its finest:
    • Jake:  People don’t have great track records of stopping hurricanes.
    • Flynn:  Well, they haven’t had the resources of the library. [Snaps his fingers, turns to Jenkins] Zeus’s lightning bolt?

The second episode continued the Prospero storyline. The librarians are trying to prevent him from putting his broken staff back together while also trying to protect the heart of the library. The library’s security system actually traps the librarians inside the library, so they have to work together (sensing a theme here) and use the library’s internal resources in order to stop Prospero and protect the “tree of knowledge” at the heart of the library.

My favorite bits from Episode 2, “And the Broken Staff”:

  • Almost 10 minutes in, Ezekiel researches references to lost or broken staffs in the old-school library card catalog. Actually, this scene both amused AND infuriated me. (Especially because Ezekiel is tossing the cards onto the stairs as he goes through them. NOT COOL. You better be planning on re-filing those cards, dude.)
    • Ezekiel:  I’ve got references to a bunch of lost magic staffs in here…
    • Jake:  Just cross-reference staff with “broken”
    • Ezekiel:  How? It’s not like it’s a search engine.
    • Jake:  What do you mean, how? You don’t know how to use a card catalog?!
    • Ezekiel:  It’s the 21st century. I don’t know how to shoe a horse, either.

Jake’s look of outraged incredulity during this scene was PRICELESS. I feel you, Jake, I feel you.

Reel Librarians | Screenshot from Season 2 premiere of 'The Librarians'

What do you mean, how? You don’t know how to use a card catalog?! Screenshot from Season 2 premiere of ‘The Librarians’

I AM RAISING MY HAND SO HARD, Y’ALL.

  • 20 minutes in, the librarians-in-training have to bribe a young girl who checked out the local library’s only copy of the unabridged, complete works of Shakespeare. I guess you can put a price on knowledge… 😉
  • Almost 40 minutes in, Flynn’s attempt at soothing Frankenstein’s monster:  Hug it out. For humanity. Yes. There’s no need for violence. This is how librarians solve problems. With our minds and our hearts. [Frankenstein’s monster throws hims off.] Worth a shot.
  • Eve’s eternal frustration with Flynn because he never has a plan; rather, he just goes off adventuring and reacting in the moment. And 46 minutes in, she totally calls him on it:  I want you to stop. And think! (I also love that the planner in the group is the non-librarian.)
  • 55 minutes in, Flynn’s description of the tree of knowledge:  Knowledge is young, always growing. No matter how much [knowledge] you think you have, there’s always room to grow.

My favorite aspects of the series are still in full force. It’s so earnest and fun, and you learn a little (or a lot) along the way. In fact, what I said last year still sums up what I find appealing about the entire series:

Reel Librarians | Quote from 'First Impressions' review of 'The Librarians' TV series premiere

I always finish watching an episode of “The Librarians” with a smile on my face. 😀

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2 comments on “Second impressions? Season 2 premiere of ‘The Librarians’

  1. popegrutch says:

    I used card catalogs in grade school and possibly High School as well(?) I think there were already some kind of primitive OPACs at my undergrad, and I recall that NYPL went to a weird system of printed-book-catalogs in the mid-1980s (my father actually helped with that transition). I still wouldn’t know how to “cross reference,” unless he means look at the card that says “staff” then look at the card that says “broken” and see which call numbers appear on both. Is that how you do it?

    • I fondly remember card catalogs, and years ago, I helped my mother, a school librarian, transition from the physical card catalogs to her first online catalog. And in my office in my current library, I have one section of the old card catalog drawers that I use to house office supplies. 🙂

      Cross-referencing would mean following the “see also” notes at the bottom of the cards, or cross-checking subject headings listed on the cards to see if there are any in common. In my head, for this scenario, there would be subject cards similar to “Staffs, Lost” with see-also references to “Staffs, Broken” and vice versa.

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